‘It Feels Really Good’: Former Desiring God Writer Renounces Christianity

‘It Feels Really Good’: Former Desiring God Writer Renounces Christianity


A former writer for Desiring God has renounced Christianity, adding to the list of high-profile Christians who have likewise walked away from the faith in recent times.

Paul Maxwell, a former philosophy professor at Moody Bible Institute, made the announcement on his Instagram feed that he was no longer a Christian, The Christian Post reports.

“What I really miss is connection with people,” Maxwell wrote. “What I’ve discovered is that I’m ready to connect again. And I’m kind of ready not to be angry anymore. I love you guys, and I love all the friendships and support I’ve built here. And I think it’s important to say that I’m just not a Christian anymore, and it feels really good. I’m really happy.”

“I can’t wait to discover what kind of connection I can have with all of you beautiful people as I try to figure out what’s next,” he continued. “I love you guys. I’m in a really good spot. Probably the best spot of my life. I’m so full of joy for the first time. I love my life.”

In a follow-up post, Maxell responded to people telling him that he will go to Hell if he rejects Christianity.

“I just say, ‘I know that you love me.’ I know, and I receive it as love,” he said. “I know you care about the eternal state of my soul and you pushed through the social awkwardness of telling me this because you don’t want me to suffer. And that is a good thing. That’s a loving thing to do. And I hear where you’re coming from, and I respect your perspective.”

Maxwell, who has his Ph.D. in theology, has authored books on theology, trauma and fitness, including the book, The Trauma of Doctrine. He was also the host of the YouTube channel SelfWire, which explores the intersection of theology, philosophy, psychology, and politics.

Maxwell is the latest high-profile Christian to publicly renounced his faith.

As Christian Headlines previously reported, in 2020, the lead singer of the Christian rock band Hawk Nelson, Jon Steingard, posted on Instagram that he no longer believes in God despite growing up as a pastor’s kid.

In 2019, Joshua Harris, the author of the popular Christian book I Kissed Dating Goodbye and former Hillsong singer and songwriter Marty Sampson also publicly renounced their Christian faith.

Related:

Another High-Profile Christian Walks Away. What’s Going On?

Hillsong’s Marty Sampson: ‘I’m Genuinely Losing My Faith’

Courtship Author Joshua Harris Falls from the Faith: ‘I Am Not a Christian’

‘I No Longer Believe in God,’ Says Lead Singer of Christian Band Hawk Nelson

Hawk Nelson Members Release Statement following Frontman’s Departure from Christianity

Photo courtesy: ©Sparrowstock


Milton Quintanilla is a freelance writer. He is also the co-hosts of the For Your Soul podcast, which seeks to equip the church with biblical truth and sound doctrine Visit his blog Blessed Are The Forgiven.

Trump blasts Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson for vetoing bill banning ‘chemical castration of children’ 



Former U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. | Getty Images/Joe Raedle

Former President Donald Trump rebuked Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson for vetoing a bill banning the “chemical castration of children” in his state.  

“The lightweight RINO Governor of Arkansas, just vetoed a Bill that banned the CHEMICAL CASTRATION OF CHILDREN. ‘Bye-bye Asa,’ that’s the end of him!” Trump said in a statement released Thursday. 

The 45th president went on to praise his former press secretary, whom he has endorsed for the 2022 gubernatorial race, in his statement: “Fortunately for the great state of Arkansas, Sarah Huckabee Sanders will do a fantastic job as your next Governor.” 

The Arkansas House voted 75-25 and the Senate 25-8 on Tuesday afternoon to override the governor’s veto of House Bill 1570, also known as the “Save Adolescents From Experimentation Act” and its acronym, the SAFE Act.  

Arkansas is the first state in the nation to ban the prescribing of puberty blockers, hormonal drugs and the surgical body mutilation of minors suffering from gender dysphoria.  

The medicalization of gender has come under increased scrutiny in recent months, particularly in light of a U.K. court ruling in a judicial review against the Tavistock clinic in London. Last year it was decided that youth younger than 16 lack the maturity to understand the risks to such experimental and irreversible procedures and thus cannot give informed consent under the Gillick competency, the U.K.’s legal standard by which youth can consent to medical procedures.

In addition to Arkansas, Alabama and Tennessee are considering similar bills. The proposed measures in the cluster of southern states follow an unsuccessful attempt in South Dakota last year to prohibit the use of puberty-suppressing drugs, cross-sex hormones, and elective cosmetic surgeries, such as a double mastectomy (what’s known as “top surgery”) or orchiectomy (“bottom surgery”), which is the removal of the testicles.

In an interview with Fox News’ Tucker Carlson earlier this week, Hutchinson defended his veto of the bill on the grounds of limited government. 

“Why do you think it’s important for conservatives to make certain that children can block their puberty, be chemically castrated? Why is that a conservative value?” Carlson inquired of the Arkansas governor. 

Hutchinson replied: “You have parents involved in very difficult decisions” and “physicians that are involved in these decisions.”

When Hutchinson asserted the medical expertise of various groups in favor of administering the experimental drugs, Carlson pressed him to explain further. 

Hutchinson added: “The research that I have seen shows that these troubled youth, these ones that have gender dysphoria, that they also have depression, they have suicidal tendencies. It’s a higher suicide rate than others. And they go to their parents, the parents go to doctors and they try to deal with this very difficult issue.” 

Studies have shown that depression or suicidal ideation are not reduced after individuals undergo procedures to change their bodies to look more like the opposite sex. 

According to a 2003 study conducted in Sweden, those who underwent body mutilation or were prescribed cross-sex hormones had a higher suicide rate than the general population.

The study, which followed 191 male-to-female gender reassignments and 133 female-to-male gender reassignments from 1973–2003, found that suicide attempts and in-patient psychiatric treatment actually increased among those who had a sex change.

Other studies have also shown that gender-transition surgery doesn’t improve mental health.

To read The Christian Post’s six-part series on transgender issues, click here

Former Desiring God contributor Paul Maxwell leaves the Christian faith




(Photo: Instagram/PaulMaxwellCo)

Paul Maxwell, former contributor to John Piper’s hugely popular apologetics website Desiring God, has announced he is no longer a Christian. 

Maxwell has a PhD in philosophy from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and is a former professor of philosophy at the Moody Bible Institute. He currently works for Tithe.ly, a church tithing app. 

He wrote dozens of articles for Desiring God between 2014 and 2017, many of them on dating, relationships and issues affecting Christian men. 

But in an emotional Instagram Stories video, he revealed that he is no longer a Christian. 

In the video, he fought back tears as he told his friends and followers that he is happy and contemplating his next step.

“What I really miss is connection with people,” he said.

“What I’ve discovered is that I’m ready to connect again. And I’m kind of ready not to be angry anymore. I love you guys, and I love all the friendships and support I’ve built here.

“And I think it’s important to say that I’m just not a Christian anymore, and it feels really good. I’m really happy.

“I can’t wait to discover what kind of connection I can have with all of you beautiful people as I try to figure out what’s next.


READ MORE: After another Christian loses faith, is convenience Christianity to blame?


“I love you guys. I’m in a really good spot. Probably the best spot of my life. I’m so full of joy for the first time. I love my life.”

He also revealed that some people had told him he’s going to go Hell now, but he added that he’s not angry with them. 

“I just say, ‘I know that you love me.’ I know, and I receive it as love,” he said.

“I know you care about the eternal state of my soul and you pushed through the social awkwardness of telling me this because you don’t want me to suffer. And that is a good thing. That’s a loving thing to do.

“And I hear where you’re coming from, and I respect your perspective.”

A number of high profile Christians have given up the faith in the last few years, including I Kissed Dating Goodbye author Joshua Harris, Hillsong worship leader Marty Sampson, and more recently Hawk Nelson frontman Jon Steingard. 

When Harris left the faith, he said: “Many people tell me that there is a different way to practise faith and I want to remain open to this, but I’m not there now.”

In 2019, Sampson wrestled publicly with his Christian faith before shocking the global church with his decision to call it quits. 

“It was amazing being one of you, but I’m not any more,” he said at the time. 

“I love you all, and I always will. I won’t forget how much I love Christians, even if they don’t love me, I will always love you. Sorry for any bad words I have ever said about any of you. Forgive me. I love you all.”

Steingard now describes his spirituality as “curious”, and hosts a video discussion series on his Instagram page in which he discusses life, faith and Christianity. 

On Twitter, he recently posted: “I no longer call myself a Christian but I’ve never been more deeply fascinated by the Bible. Anyone else have this experience?”




Church leaders pay tribute to ‘extraordinary’ Prince Philip




The Queen and Prince Philip being greeted by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the former Archbishop of York at Westminster AbbeyReuters

Church leaders have paid tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, who has died aged 99 after 73 faithful years as the Queen’s consort.

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, said today: “I join with the rest of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth in mourning the loss of His Royal Highness Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh, and give thanks to God for his extraordinary life of dedicated service.

“Prince Philip continually demonstrated his unfailing support and unstinting loyalty to Her Majesty The Queen for 73 years.

“He consistently put the interests of others ahead of his own and, in so doing, provided an outstanding example of Christian service. During his naval career, in which he served with distinction in the Second World War, he won the respect of his peers as an outstanding officer.

“On the occasions when I met him, I was always struck by his obvious joy at life, his enquiring mind and his ability to communicate to people from every background and walk of life. He was a master at putting people at their ease and making them feel special.” 

He went on to pay special tribute to his achievements, having founded the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award in 1956 to inspire young people to help others, and his “powerful” advocacy for conservation. 

“The legacy he leaves is enormous,” Welby said.

“As we recover and rebuild after the terrible trial of the coronavirus pandemic, we will need fortitude and a deep sense of commitment to serving others. Throughout his life Prince Philip displayed those qualities in abundance, and I pray that we can take inspiration from his example.

“I also join many people in giving thanks for the marriage of Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip, and for their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Theirs was a marriage grounded in friendship and mutual respect and sustained by shared faith in Christ.

“I pray that God will comfort Her Majesty and the rest of the Royal family at this time. May His Royal Highness rest in peace and rise in glory.”

The Archbishop of York, Stephen Cottrell, said the Duke was a “remarkable man who lived a life of service dedicated to his country, to his wife, Queen Elizabeth II and his family”.

“At eighteen, Prince Philip joined the Royal Navy and served with distinction throughout the Second World War. At the same time, the beginnings of a cherished friendship with Princess Elizabeth began to blossom,” he said. 

“That friendship resulted in a marriage which lasted for over 70 years and has been a source of mutual joy, support and comfort in private moments but equally as they have both navigated a very public life together.

“Having become the longest serving British consort, Prince Philip has been unstinting in his support, leading Her Majesty to famously comment, ‘he has, quite simply, been my strength and stay all these years.'”

He added: “His faith in Jesus Christ was an important part of his life and one which shaped who he was.”

“Do join me in praying for members of the Royal family as they mourn and may God bring them comfort. As we give thanks to God for a life lived to the full, may Prince Philip rest in peace and rise in glory.” 

Prince Philip was born at the family home, Mon Repos on the Greek island of Corfu on June 10, 1921, but his family was forced into exile in Britain after his father, an officer in the Greek army was charged with treason during the Greco-Turkish war.

The Queen married Prince Philip at Westminster Abbey in 1947. 

The Royal family announced “with deep sorrow” the passing of the Queen’s “beloved husband” on Friday morning.

“His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle,” the announcement said. 

The Archbishop of Wales, John Davies, praised the Duke for sacrificing his own personal life and career and choosing to “steadfastly” remain by the Queen’s side over the decades. 

“Despite his retirement from public life in 2017, it is unimaginable that, away from the public gaze, his support of and for the Queen wavered as she continued to fulfil her official duties and headship of the Royal family,” he said.

“In both spheres, the Queen has, over more than seven decades of married life, faced countless crises and massive demands, and His Royal Highness, both sustained and strengthened her throughout.

“It is quite commonplace nowadays for someone to be described as a rock in the life of another individual. In the case of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh, it is entirely fitting.” 

He also commented on the Duke’s personal faith and interest in Christian matters.

“Less well-known is the Duke’s theologically inquiring mind. Some, but possibly not many, will have heard of and read ‘A Windsor Correspondence’, a small book of some 80 pages, published in 1984 containing the correspondence that passed between the Duke and the then Dean of Windsor, the Very Rev’d Michael Mann,” he said.

“The catalyst for the correspondence was Sir Fred Hoyle’s co-authored 1981 work and associated 1982 lecture ‘Evolution from Space’ the subject matter of which was the probability of the existence of God and the origin of life from space, directed by a great intelligence.

“The Duke was also a noted, and usually constructive, critic of some of the many sermons he and the Queen heard preached over many years.

“These are but a few examples from a long life, packed with variety and rooted in the service of others, the nation, the Commonwealth and beyond. For his gifts and talents, for the benefits that his life brought to the lives of others, for his sense of duty and calling, and for his many evident and admirable qualities and attributes, we should give thanks and pray that he might be at peace, free from human frailty, and in new life with Christ.

“It is the Queen and the rest of their family who will feel most keenly and lament most profoundly the Duke’s passing. May they also be able to give thanks for all that he brought to others in so many ways and over so many years. I assure them all of my love and prayers and those of many in the Church in Wales.” 

Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, remembered the Prince as the Queen’s “faithful and loyal husband”.

“I pray for the Queen and all of the Royal family,” he said. 

“How much we will miss Prince Philip’s presence and character, so full of life and vigour. He has been an example of steadfast loyalty and duty cheerfully given. May he rest in peace.”

Paul Williams, Chief Executive of Bible Society, whose Patron has been the Queen since her accession in 1952, said: “We join with millions in giving thanks to God for his contribution to the life of our nation, and most of all for his long and loving partnership with our Queen.

“We pray for her, for Prince Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward, and for all who mourn his loss.

“May God bless them and comfort them in their grief, and assure them of his loving purposes for them.”